How Often Do You Need Your Radiator Flushed in Cincinnati?

Whether or not you’re due for a radiator flush has more to do with the winter in Cincinnati than it does with mileage or years. Sure, most car manuals tell you every 40,000 to 60,000 miles, or every other year, but the reality varies widely, depending on the quality of the radiator fluid, the climate the car is driven, and a host of other factors. It’s not something you can just put on your to-do calendar like renewing your driver’s license.

Over time, the fluid in your radiator becomes acidic, losing its ability to protect your engine against extreme temperatures. The good news is you can purchase your own radiator fluid test from any mechanic and most auto parts stores. The directions are pretty simple. Place the strip in the coolant, and compare the color to the field of tests on the back of the box. If the right color matches up, you’re due for a Cincinnati radiator flush.\

Flushing Your Radiator Yourself

If you decide to drain your radiator, there are several online videos that can walk you through the process. Always wait for the radiator cap to cool for several hours before beginning, as the pressure on the cap can be dangerous if released while hot. And always use a 50/50 mix of water and coolant, even in the summer. Water alone will freeze in the winter. If you’re in a bind during hot weather, water will get you home, but make sure to mix evenly with coolant. Frozen water in a radiator can ruin your cooling system.

Should You Do Your Own Car Repair, Cincinnati?

Fancy yourself a weekend mechanic? If you’ve got the right tools and a few basic skills, you can perform many repairs on your car yourself, save some money and feel good that you solved the problem with your own knowhow. Keep in mind, however, there is a reason mechanics swear a lot. Do your research. Shop manuals can help walk you through it, but what you really should check out are online videos that can show you exactly how it’s done. And keep a bucket handy for any screws or other parts. It’s a nightmare when that all important tiny part gets lost down a drain or behind the tool bench.

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